Psoriasis & Nutritional Disorders

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Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease characterized by red patches covered with white scales. This chronic allergic inflammation is not contagious or malignant but people often scratch continually to relieve itching sensation of the skin. Psoriasis can affect many parts of the body, including your knees, elbows and feet.

It is an immunodeficiency disorder, occurring when the body’s resistance power or immunity is reduced due to the effects of illness or its treatment. Skin become scaly with small red spots around the affected parts and sometimes tears, giving rise to oozing of blood.

Pathology

In immunodeficiency disease, patients lack the ability to produce antibodies, which are essential in the recovery from infections. Low antibody levels or lack of specific antibodies lead to increased infection. Antibody deficiencies also trigger the secretion of many biochemicals, which fight against viruses and bacteria. Some important biochemicals secreted in the absence of antibodies include histamine, bradykinin, cytokines and interleukin. They give the sensation of itchiness, redness and other manifestations of allergy such as skin rash and dermatitis at the time of fighting with infections and diseases.

Prevalence of Psoriasis

According to wrongdiagnosis.com, psoriasis affects 1.5 to 2 percent of the population of the United States. Psoriasis tends to affect women more often than men. Genes have been found to influence the risk of developing this disorder. People with fair-skin have a higher likelihood of developing psoriasis.

Nutritional Disorders

Some foods can cause allergies. Psoriasis begins with a process called sensitization of the skin. Allergic reactions may be triggered by a wide range of food substances, which contain allergens. Foods such as sugar, eggs, red meat, alcoholic beverages, oil and onions can bring about severe allergic reactions and make the condition even worse. Heath experts generally recommend certain allergy tests to psoriasis patients. These allergy tests are carried out either on a blood sample or on the skin. Medical service providers may also suggest shunning those foods that can aggravate the complications of psoriasis, including foods that include dairy products, gluten and meats.

Beneficial Foods

Some foods have been shown to have beneficial effects in regards to psoriasis. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, omega-3 fatty acids along with omega-6 fatty acids are very effective in reducing the intense inflammation of psoriasis. Omega-3 fatty acids can be found in fish, including salmon, tuna and halibut. Some green vegetables also promote protection against psoriasis. Most green and colored fruits are a significant source of vitamins, including vitamin C and B complex. A diet rich in vegetables and fruits will help reduce the symptoms of psoriasis.

Antioxidants

Exposure to environmental stimuli interferes with the body’s operation. The body sees the stimulus as harmful and tries to attack it. This reaction generates free radicals and oxidative stress elements inside the body. Free radicals inifict damage on many internal body organs. In extreme cases, they may even cause cancer. Antioxidants resist the production of free radicals and thereby, induce a protective mechanism inside the body. Foods containing selenium (a photosensitive element), vitamin A and D are good antioxidants. Antioxidants also promote immune system, and a regular intake of these foods help reduce the complications of psoriasis.

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